Self-Publishing Grabs Huge Market Share From Traditional Publishers

David Biddle:

Quite interesting analysis here by one of the mavens of the new world of digital/independent publishing.

Originally posted on David Gaughran:

godzillBarnes & Noble re-launched PubIt! this week as Nook Press, a largely superficial makeover which failed to address some fundamental problems, like restricting access to US self-publishers only, and introduced new howler: updating existing titles causes the loss of all ranking, reviews, and momentum.

There were only two noteworthy things, to me, about this launch. First, the PubIt! brand had been closely associated with Barnes & Noble. This re-launch seems like an attempt to tie the Nook Press brand to their subsidiary Nook Media, probably in advance of a sale (Barnes & Noble already sold a stake to Microsoft, and a smaller slice to Pearson – Penguin’s parent company but maintain a controlling interest in Nook Media).

This re-launch is full of things that sound great in a corporate press release (innovative editing tools!) that most professional self-publishers won’t really care about, which makes me further suspect this is more…

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David Biddle:

There’s a slew of lessons in this post by Nate Thayer, although you need to read the comments to get the full story. Some serious miscommunication here all the way around. Still, it’s 2013 and writers continue to get the short end of the stick.

Originally posted on natethayer:

A Day in the Life of a Freelance Journalist—2013

Here is an exchange between the Global Editor of the Atlantic Magazine and myself this afternoon attempting to solicit my professional services for an article they sought to publish after reading my story “25 Years of Slam Dunk Diplomacy: Rodman trip comes after 25 years of basketball diplomacy between U.S. and North Korea”   here http://www.nknews.org/2013/03/slam-dunk-diplomacy/ at NKNews.org

From the Atlantic Magazine:

On Mar 4, 2013 3:27 PM, “olga khazan” <okhazan@theatlantic.com> wrote:

Hi there — I’m the global editor for the Atlantic, and I’m trying to reach Nate Thayer to see if he’d be interested in repurposing his recent basketball diplomacy post on our site.

Could someone connect me with him, please?

thanks,
Olga Khazan
okhazan@theatlantic.com

 From the head of NK News, who originally published the piece this morning:

Hi that piece is copy right to NK News, so…

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Writers and the Holidays: Advice to Readers and Friends

kindle-christmasCottage industry has slipped back into vogue in America in the past five years. Indie authors are setting up shop in bedrooms and dining rooms and kitchen tables on every street in every neighborhood from Staten Island to Oahu. In 2005 about 300,000 new book titles hit the shelves of bookstores and the pages of Amazon. In 2012 I’ve read estimates of over 1,000,000 titles — just for this year alone!

It used to be when I told people I was working on a book, they would look at me like I was some cute, exotic monkey creature with bucked teeth and big brown eyes. Now they say, “Oh, do you know Ed Jones or Continue reading

David Biddle:

David Gaughran is someone to pay attention to on these issues. I think the venture he writes about will be short-lived and the market will take care of itself pretty quickly. I may be wrong. But I do think that in the spirit of free enterprise their are consumers who are going to need to pay a price before all is said and done (they already have been, of course, but the suckers who are born every minute have always put food on people’s tables).

That said, the most important thing here is for writers to understand what independent publishing is about. Focused, “hand-crafted,” detailed oriented artists have always been able to find great satisfaction in their work. Readers should go out of their way to support those efforts. This is just another reason to ditch books by corporate houses on principle.

Originally posted on David Gaughran:

Simon & Schuster has launched a self-publishing operation, Archway Publishing, contracting one of the most disreputable players in the business to run the show: Author Solutions.

We’ll get to that distasteful link-up in a second, but first let’s have a look at what Simon & Schuster are offering prospective customers (i.e. writers).

Fiction packages start at $1,999 and go up to $14,999. If you have written a business book, prices are saucier again: $2,999 to $24,999.

While the upper end of the pricing spectrum is obviously shocking, some of you might think that $1,999 isn’t too bad if you are getting a proper edit and a decent cover.

Not so fast.

That price tag doesn’t include any real editing, just an assessment which – according to their own website – is “not a replacement” for editorial services but “a preliminary diagnostic tool.”

But what if you need proper editing?…

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The Question World: Thoughts On Writing in the 21st Century

First thing on the path — I was running through the woods — worms writhing this mid-summer morning in a death dance after drowning all night long in a torrential, black rain. Bouncing and leaping into the air, up from their dark tunnels collapsing and spewing water everywhere, they were no doubt more afraid of drowning in that world of their own making than dying on the sunlit surface of this tiny green and blue planet with the rest of us.

I try to go down the trail silently. My dog senses this and prances methodically by my side, not even panting.

Thoughts come to me regarding the purpose of literature. It is said often that there are two schools of Continue reading

Holiday Price Slashes: Fiction By David Biddle

Up to 80% Off!

It’s Black Friday. Holiday pricing for ebook versions of Trying to Care: A Story Collection and Beyond the Will of God: A Jill Simpson Mystery are now at the rather low levels of $0.99 each. Take advantage of these offers. You can read electronic books on E-Readers, of course, but you can also download reading apps from Amazon that let you read books on your smartphone or your computer as well. Books that list at $4.99 cut by 80% to a penny under a dollar are good deals. Buy one for yourself and use Continue reading

New Book Release: everything you want to know about love and confusion

Photo: Warren Harold – http://www.thatwasmyfoot.com/

You can now buy Implosions of America: Nine Stories at Amazon’s Kindle Store ($2.99 is a good deal). It’s also available as a paperback at CreateSpace.com and the Amazon book site for $7.99.

These nine stories are about life as a maturing American watching maturing Americans mature. We all know how life can implode on us at any given moment. I am fascinated by how implosions usually don’t destroy us. They make us better and stronger and teach us lessons. And yet life continues to be such a special mess for each of us.

Implosions? Well, these stories aren’t really about huge destructions to personality, they’re more about the small stuff and the way that small stuff can affect love, dignity, and what gives meaning to waking up every day. Most of these stories, I realize after finishing the book, are memory games where longing and affection act like fogs over reality.

What I wanted to do with this book was try as best I could to remake the male psyche Continue reading

A Brief Excerpt from “So Beautiful”: Read the Rest in Implosions of America

Black bear (Ursus americanus ) removing a dead...

Black bear (Ursus americanus ) removing a dead and decaying Salmon from a creek near Hyder, Alaska. Black bears tend to be more timid than their larger relative, the Alaskan Coastal Brown bear, so they come out of the brush, grab a fish, and then go back into the brush to eat it. Brown bears will generally eat the fish where they catch it. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Below is a very short excerpt from the middle of a story in the collection Implosions of America. I’ve tried as best I can over the years to write interesting, uncommon fiction that both touches deep and makes the reader wonder about the meaning of life. Don’t ever stop wondering. Don’t ever stop looking to be touched. That is what art is all about.

From “So Beautiful,” a story about reconnecting and maturing beyond beauty. 

She said she wanted to work with grizzly bears and wolves. She said people didn’t understand them. She wanted to represent wild animals. She said that Americans needed to know that black bears will track people for food just like polar bears.

“I read a story once,” she said softly, coming down off her tears. “It was about a black bear that stole children from a village in New England and piled them in a cave on the outskirts of town. The villagers finally found the children, still alive, but wildly frightened and cold. The bear had been filling the pockets of their coats with uneaten pieces of fish he’d caught. He was using the village children to store food for the winter.”

She told me this and in my memory I saw her beautiful face and gentle lips quivering below me. Back then I never imagined someone of such beauty could have those thoughts and laugh so dangerously close to insanity. … <snip>

Implosions of America: Nine Stories will be released to the Amazon Kindle Store on Friday, November 16.

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Wanted: Reviewers and Book Bloggers

Photo image for the story “Fishing for Success”

Implosions of America: Nine Stories will be released Friday morning on Amazon as an ebook. You can already get it as a paperback at CreateSpace. The paperback will be available through Amazon before the weekend is over. I’m still thinking about whether I want to go through a shark jumping exercise and post to other sites like Smashwords, Barnes & Noble, etc. For now Amazon and CreateSpace are your best bets.

For what it’s worth, independent publishing is hard enough, what I’m doing with Implosions is close to insane. The Amazon-Indie system is astoundingly good for genre and pulp fiction — whether you’re talking romance, mystery, thriller, YA, or sci-fi. Historical fiction and non-fiction are also pretty well served. Throughout the Internet over the past several years large networks have been established for genre fiction. Book bloggers specializing in specific types of story are common. So are niche FaceBook sites, genre communities, Continue reading

Story Excerpt from the Collection Implosions of America

Final cover front & back

THE CHOICE GAME

(a 2,400 word excerpt)

The eclipsing sun pierced my right pupil for just a split second as the moon slid into place and Bailey’s Beads began to spin. Bailey’s Beads are little solar flames of prismed ruby light bouncing off the valleys of a black moon. I just needed a glimpse of that one eclipse with my naked eye. Just one tiny split of a moment. That took place up in the Cascade mountains in 1979, more than thirty years ago. I’m sure this is the cause of my vision troubles today.

Dr. Davis has been after me for several years now to visit an ophthalmologist. I used to love the way Continue reading